HUNGER: A LOUD SILENCE IN NADINE GORDIMER’S THE CONSERVATIONIST AND ITS IMPLICATION FOR BLACK SOUTH AFRICANS

HUNGER: A LOUD SILENCE IN NADINE GORDIMER’S THE CONSERVATIONIST AND ITS IMPLICATION FOR BLACK SOUTH AFRICANS

  • Celina Ngozi Enukoha Nwafor Orizu College of Education, Nsugbe, Anambra State, Nigeria.
Keywords: Hunger, malnutrition, starvation, racism.

Abstract

Hunger in South Africa draws international concerns. This paper traces the historical and contemporary roots of hunger in South Africa and its web of destructiveness that extends into all reaches of society. It is caused by fundamental challenges of apartheid policies of which the most disastrous is the Native Land Act of 1913 which left the black majority with only 13% of the entire land of South Africa. It looked into how these policies of unequal resource-benefits which deprive blacks from food, education, social relationships and freedom. Through deconstruction, Nadine Gordimer’s The Conservationist is analysed. The complication is that without education, the blacks have no voice and will remain perpetual unskilled labourers in the mines and industries unable to feed and educate their families. The suggestion is irrevocably education and the implementation of Land Appropriation Bill.

Author Biography

Celina Ngozi Enukoha, Nwafor Orizu College of Education, Nsugbe, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Lecturer

Published
2020-07-03